IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Volker Türk
    Volker Türk “Russia's full-scale armed attack on Ukraine, which is about to enter its third year with no end in sight, continues to cause serious and widespread human rights violations, destroying lives and livelihoods. The invasion has exacted a horrific human cost, inflicting immense suffering on millions of civilians.” 3 hours ago
  • Tymofiy Mylovanov
    Tymofiy Mylovanov “In 2022, the [US] administration [of Joe Biden] submitted funding requests in the spring, almost immediately after the invasion. But in 2023, it waited until mid-fall to announce what it plans to submit. Avdiivka demonstrates the cost of these political delays: human lives, lost territory, and encouraged Russia. If that's the plan 'to be with Ukraine as long as it takes', then the US delays in aid have just prolonged the war.” 5 hours ago
  • Dmytro Kuleba
    Dmytro Kuleba “The era of peace in Europe is over. And every time Ukrainian soldiers withdraw from a Ukrainian town because of the lack of ammunition, think of it not only in terms of democracy and defending the world-based order, but also in terms of Russian soldiers getting a few kilometres closer to your towns.” 5 hours ago
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#Xi Jinping

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive with the tag #Xi Jinping linked to them.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“There had been fewer attacks along the front line than usual over the past 24 hours. This could be linked to the visit to Moscow by the Chinese leader. Why? Because Putin is hardly likely to put aggression on display on the front lines, particularly as China has spoken in favour of a ceasefire and of an end to the war. So this is likely to continue throughout his two-day visit.”

author
Military analyst based in Kyiv
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“One of the assessments is that Putin acted very impulsively because of his imperial ambitions, and he has his own worldview. Xi, I think, he's much more pragmatic. He's very cautious. I don't think he's hot-headed enough and he's not a risk taker, and an invasion against Taiwan is one of the biggest acts that he would do. It's a very high-wire act and the chances of success are not clear.”

author
Director of the UC Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation at the University of California, San Diego
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“By now it should be clear to the Chinese leadership that it is unrealistic to hope to eliminate COVID-19 entirely through lockdowns and repeated testing, given the Omicron variant's high transmissibility and the large number of asymptomatic cases. The recent protests themselves have not dented Xi's political authority, but unless it adapts, the government may encounter a growing political backlash against its COVID-19 policy.”

author
Assistant Director and Senior Research Fellow of the East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore.
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“I absolutely believe there need not be a new Cold War. I've met many times with Xi Jinping. And we were candid and clear with one another across the board. And I do not think there's any imminent attempt on the part of China to invade Taiwan. And I made it clear that our policy in Taiwan has not changed at all. We're going to compete vigorously, but I'm not looking for conflict. I'm looking to manage this competition responsibly. And I want to make sure that every country abides by the international rules of the road.”

author
President of the United States
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“An abnormally lopsided victory for one faction, which is rare in the tradition of the Communist Party, in the past there would be a rough balance of power. It means there won't be any checks and balances. Xi Jinping also has total control over the larger Politburo and Central Committee.”

author
Senior Fellow at US think-tank the Jamestown Foundation
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“Ploughing on with zero-Covid could indicate an information deficit. Where nobody really dares to tell Xi Jinping things because he's so powerful.”

author
Senior fellow for China studies at the Council on Foreign Relations (CFR)
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“Everybody is silent. There is almost no opposition - checks and balances - in the party leadership anymore. The entire atmosphere in China now is anybody talks about or discusses about the negatives of Xi Jinping would have … trouble today. You see, that's the problem.”

author
Professor of political science at Guilford College in the United States and author of The Politics of the Core Leader in China
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“They cheer-lead on behalf of each other, offering moral and political support to their partner when their interests align. But China and Russia are strategically autonomous actors, whose influence on each other's behaviour is limited and indirect at best. And rather than being propelled into a new orbit of cooperation, the long-term outlook for the Russia-China relationship is not promising. The Xi and Putin relationship is primarily based on the self-interests of two strategically autonomous powers and a fundamental difference is that China is invested in global order. China wishes to play a more dominant role, but it does not wish to demolish that order. Putin, however, is focused on disruptive power and a complete overthrow of the international system. That is why Putin has resorted so readily to military force - in Georgia, Syria, Ukraine and, more covertly, in Iraq, Libya, Mali and the Central African Republic. Russia, but not China, has invested in the value of waging war. He [Putin] and those around him identify Russia's ability and will to wage war as a comparative advantage that few others, apart from the United States, possess.”

author
Non-resident fellow at Australia’s think-tank the Lowy Institute
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“A leader more open to influence or subject to greater checks would not likely have implemented such a draconian policy [spring 2022 lockdown in Shanghai], or at least would have corrected course once its costs and unpopularity became evident. But for Xi, backtracking would have been an unthinkable admission of error.”

author
Retired professor at the Communist Party’s top academy
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“Often, the heads of different departments and companies attend one meeting in the morning about enhancing dynamic zero, and then in the afternoon a meeting about economic growth. The tensions are within Xi's own model for governing the country. The tensions really arise from him.”

author
Independent political commentator in Beijing
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“Both inside the Party and outside the Party, people are anxious about the centralisation of power around Xi [Xi Jinping]. I think we can read the increasing prominence of Li in that context. I think there are more people trying to signal their anxiety of Xi Jinping's centralisation of power and the potential future by supporting Li Keqiang in some way. It would be a mistake to think that Li is now able to counterbalance Xi, who has spent his first two terms in office building up personal power at the expense of his premier. I think Xi is probably making a tactical retreat on economics, so letting Li shoulder the economic troubles, if things go wrong then you've got the premier to blame, and if it goes right then it's to the benefit of Xi, and it eases some of the internal pressure.”

author
China watcher and editor of the current affairs newsletter China Neican
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“After lionising Xi [Xi Jinping] for many months, the president was absent from the front page of the People's Daily newspaper five times in May - just below the unofficial threshold that something may be afoot. Li [Li Keqiang], by contrast, has been slightly more visible as state media shared a transcript of his economic summit on social media, further intensifying speculation. From late April through May, corresponding to new questions over the handling of COVID in Shanghai and pressures on the economy, the signals have to some extent been mixed. It has no longer been all Xi all of the time. This has led to speculation that perhaps Xi is facing headwinds within the Party over his handling of the crisis - and that this might be an opportunity for Li, who may have very different ideas about where to go with the economy.”

author
Co-director of the China Media Project
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“It's fairly clear that Xi Jinping views his most important legacy as making China a superpower, as returning China to what he sees as its historically rightful place as a world power. And that means economic growth, but it also means becoming a military power that's able to exert a large influence on politics in the Asia-Pacific region and beyond. For the US, focusing on competition with China is one of the few things that unites Republicans and Democrats. There's definitely a desire to preserve America's superpower status and its influence in the world order, which does mean that these two countries do have conflicting objectives to a certain extent. So, there is certainly potential for tensions at the very least.”

author
Associate professor of government and Asian studies at Bowdoin College in the US state of Maine
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“I think the Chinese leadership is looking very carefully at all this - at the costs and consequences of any effort to use force to gain control over Taiwan. I don't for a minute think that this has eroded Xi's [Xi Jinping] determination over time to gain control over Taiwan. But I think it's something that's affecting their calculation about how and when they go about doing that.”

author
CIA Director
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“A common view is that while the war is bad, we must support Russia in this battle to defend China's interests. Because without Russia to hold up the West, China will be the next target. Such a view has not been formed in a day but instilled over time. State media might have fed the information, but the public sentiment has always been there. People worship Putin, because he is aligned with Xi Jinping. They share the same strongman image and governance style.”

author
Media veteran now based in Hong Kong
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“The call between Biden and Xi came as a really important moment, with the US engaging in something of a diplomatic offensive to try to call out, and even to shame, China for its somewhat neutral stance over Ukraine. In particular, the intelligence the US publicised about the Russian request for the provision of Chinese military assistance will almost certainly be a feature of how Biden approaches this call - presumably to berate Xi Jinping for even entertaining this and berating China for not turning their back on Russia during the Russian invasion. However, it is highly unlikely China is going to walk away from its ambitious goal of boosting its already deep economic ties with Russia. Because China trades with Russia openly - it buys its crude oil, gas among other things - it is indirectly supporting Russia and I think it's flight of fancy to think that China would turn its back on its economic relationship with Russia, even if it steps back from providing fresh military support and equipment.”

author
Senior fellow in hybrid warfare at the International Institute for Strategic Studies
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