IPSE'S AUTHORS LAST 24h
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IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Alexander Novak
    Alexander Novak “We are working on mechanisms to prohibit the use of a price cap instrument, regardless of what level is set, because such interference could further destabilise the market. We will sell oil and petroleum products only to those countries that will work with us under market conditions, even if we have to reduce production a little.” 16 hours ago
  • Scot Marciel
    Scot Marciel “Beyond the re-appointment of Kyaw Moe Tun in the UN, Russia is being difficult to work with [in terms of reaching a consensus in the international community to pressure the regime] and is publicly backing the junta. China seems to be consolidating its support for the regime as well. It's different from 2021. They provide tangible support for the junta, whereas those who support the resistance and the anti-coup movement are more rhetorical in their support.” 16 hours ago
  • Chen Gang
    Chen Gang “By now it should be clear to the Chinese leadership that it is unrealistic to hope to eliminate COVID-19 entirely through lockdowns and repeated testing, given the Omicron variant's high transmissibility and the large number of asymptomatic cases. The recent protests themselves have not dented Xi's political authority, but unless it adapts, the government may encounter a growing political backlash against its COVID-19 policy.” 16 hours ago
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#US

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive with the tag #US linked to them.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“We have interfered, we are interfering and we will continue to interfere - carefully, accurately, surgically and in our own way, as we know how to do. During our pinpoint operations, we will remove both kidneys and the liver at once.”

author
Founder of Russia’s Wagner Group, a private mercenary force
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“I hope that in today's situation, President Joe Biden will have more opportunities to understand who gives orders and how. This situation is very disturbing. The difference is that in the distant 1962, Khrushchev and Kennedy found the strength to show responsibility and wisdom, and now we do not see such readiness on the part of Washington and its satellites. The readiness of Russia, including its president, to negotiate [on Ukraine], it remains unchanged. We will always be ready to listen to what proposals our Western partners have to de-escalate tensions.”

author
Russian Foreign Minister
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“There's been a lot of debates between experts about whether drones will be used in more advanced fights, like a potential US-China conflict. These examples [in Ukraine] are evidence that drones will be used extensively even by more advanced military powers. We're seeing the military value in using large amounts of mass drones, so a logical response would be 'Well, how do we make this more effective? How can we integrate this with other communications, make it more dynamic, make it more precise?' The technology is certainly going in a direction where these are the future of war.”

author
Policy fellow at the Schar School of Policy and Government who researches unconventional weapons and technology
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“It seems to me that the Americans have been participating de facto in this war for a long time. This war is being controlled by the Anglo-Saxons. Officials including White House national security spokesman John Kirby had said the United States was open to talks but that Russia had refused. This is a lie. We have not received any serious offers to make contact.”

author
Russian Foreign Minister
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“Pyongyang has been concerned about military exercises by the U.S., South Korea and Japan, so to strengthen its self-proclaimed deterrent, it is making explicit the nuclear threat behind its recent missile launches. The KCNA report may also be harbinger of a forthcoming nuclear test for the kind of tactical warhead that would arm the units Kim visited in the field.”

author
Professor at Ewha University in Seoul
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“Even the concessions that North Korea would want, I think, are very much unclear at the moment. It's quite possible that the North Koreans are simply… they see the current moment as a great moment of geopolitical realignment in the world with Russia's war against Ukraine, and systemic rivalry between the US and China. And they might have calculated that instead of pursuing negotiations with the United States and trying to revisit that relationship, which they've been trying to revisit for now, really 30 years, their cause is better served by simply doubling down on their relationships with Russia and China.”

author
Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
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“I know the people must be worried, but our government will thoroughly take care of the people's lives and safety through a strong South Korea-U.S. alliance and security cooperation between South Korea, the U.S. and Japan.”

author
President of South Korea
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“There is no way that the U.S. government will revise the law because Biden has touted it as one of his biggest achievements in office ahead of the midterm elections in November. In addition, the U.S. cannot give an exception only to Korea, while its other close allies are subject to the IRA [Inflation Reduction Act].”

author
Professor of North Korean studies at Ewha Womans University
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“We will witness the formation of a new bloc to counterweight the US, but not a 'Russia-centric' one, as the Kremlin tries to present in, but in the format of 'Beijing and its comrade's'.”

author
Belarusian analyst based in Ukraine
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“The US has provided weaponry to Taiwan for many, many decades, but the timing of the new sale had political or public relations value coming amid heightened tensions between Taipei and Beijing. To be frank this sale is relatively small. The bulk of the sale is related to the maintenance of existing radar facilities. China is likely to respond, and has already started with statements. Beijing could also launch more incursions in Taiwan's air defence identification zone, start new military exercises, ban certain Taiwanese products from being imported to China, impose sanctions against US and Taiwanese government officials, or take action against US companies doing business in China. So China always has the options, of using any of those tools. It won't stop this particular weapons sale though.”

author
Asia political risk analyst based in Taipei
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“I am delighted to arrive in Sudan. I look forward to deepening relations between Americans and Sudanese and to supporting the Sudanese people's aspirations to freedom, peace, justice, and a transition to democracy.”

author
US ambassador to Sudan
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“[We] are only issuing a warning to the perpetrators. China would firmly smash the Taiwan authorities' illusion of gaining independence through the US. We urge the US to do some earnest reflection, and immediately correct its mistakes.”

author
Spokesperson of China and deputy director of the Foreign Ministry Information Department of China
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“The US should move from strategic ambiguity to strategic clarity on cross-strait affairs and re-examine its one China policy. It is my personal view that the one China policy has outlived its usefulness and that it is time to move away from strategic ambiguity. I think it is important that we begin that national discussion back in the US, but it will help that discussion and help us educate the American people if we can also point to bold decisions being made in Taipei, such as increase in defense spending, adoption of asymmetric warfare and corresponding capabilities, lengthening conscription and making it more rigorous, and improving reserve mobilization. It is important that the American people and our leaders in Washington see that the Taiwan people are fully committed to standing up to communist China and defending themselves as democracies of the world stand behind Taiwan. We cannot allow the Chinese to rise within the international system and try to dismantle it to suit their own ends, means and values. Much has changed since the one China policy was articulated in the 1970s.”

author
Former United States Secretary of Defense
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“Meaningful consensus, on even a limited scale, is simply not possible when there are such deeply conflicting sets of political-economic interest. Facilitation of Russia's interests as a part of a compromise deal, for example, would undoubtedly be viewed by other G20 nations, such as the US and UK, as helping to facilitate and legitimise its war on Ukraine. A sizable chunk of G20 countries are actively opposed to Russia's invasion. It is extremely naïve to imagine consensus would be possible and that this wouldn't overshadow the entire event.”

author
Lecturer in politics and security studies at Murdoch University in Perth
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“There are many things that the US can do, such as easing sanctions on [North Korea] in certain areas, and ending joint military exercises [with South Korea]. The key is to take actions, not just talk about its readiness for dialogue with no preconditions.”

author
China’s UN Ambassador
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“We urge relevant US politicians to earnestly abide by the one-China principle, and immediately stop official exchanges with Taiwan in any form and refrain from sending any wrong signals to the 'Taiwan independence' separatist forces. China will continue to take forceful measures to resolutely safeguard China's sovereignty and territorial integrity.”

author
Spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry
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“The next step is likely to be a flurry of behind-the-scenes diplomacy, and international pressure, to convince Turkey to quickly remove the roadblock. Sweden and Finland will seek to placate Turkey, but we can also expect the US and the EU to play a leading role in this pressure campaign. After all, both have some leverage over Turkey, be it through [Washington's] sale of military equipment or the [EU's] provision of aid as part of the 2016 migration deal. The most likely outcome remains Finland and Sweden joining the alliance very soon. Erdogan is a transactional leader, and the costs of blocking the two Nordic countries - deeply angering Western allies - would far outweigh the benefits in terms of domestic support. Erdogan also briefly blocked in 2009 the nomination of Anders Fogh Rasmussen as NATO's secretary-general, before relenting after receiving a prize in a high-level appointment for a Turkish official in the alliance. Since the rest of the alliance is welcoming Finland and Sweden with open arms, there is clear political will to overcome this temporary roadblock.”

author
Lecturer and co-director of the Transatlantic Policy Center at American University
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“Khamenei told the emir [Qatar's emir Sheikh Tamim bin Hamad Al Thani] we have always said the negotiations must yield results, not waste time, and the Americans know what they need to do regarding this. It is very clear from the context of the leader's remarks that the ball is in the US court, which must make wise political decisions to fulfill its obligations.”

author
Spokesman of the Foreign Ministry of Iran
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