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IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Alexander Novak
    Alexander Novak “We are working on mechanisms to prohibit the use of a price cap instrument, regardless of what level is set, because such interference could further destabilise the market. We will sell oil and petroleum products only to those countries that will work with us under market conditions, even if we have to reduce production a little.” 16 hours ago
  • Scot Marciel
    Scot Marciel “Beyond the re-appointment of Kyaw Moe Tun in the UN, Russia is being difficult to work with [in terms of reaching a consensus in the international community to pressure the regime] and is publicly backing the junta. China seems to be consolidating its support for the regime as well. It's different from 2021. They provide tangible support for the junta, whereas those who support the resistance and the anti-coup movement are more rhetorical in their support.” 17 hours ago
  • Chen Gang
    Chen Gang “By now it should be clear to the Chinese leadership that it is unrealistic to hope to eliminate COVID-19 entirely through lockdowns and repeated testing, given the Omicron variant's high transmissibility and the large number of asymptomatic cases. The recent protests themselves have not dented Xi's political authority, but unless it adapts, the government may encounter a growing political backlash against its COVID-19 policy.” 17 hours ago
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#China

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive with the tag #China linked to them.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Beyond the re-appointment of Kyaw Moe Tun in the UN, Russia is being difficult to work with [in terms of reaching a consensus in the international community to pressure the regime] and is publicly backing the junta. China seems to be consolidating its support for the regime as well. It's different from 2021. They provide tangible support for the junta, whereas those who support the resistance and the anti-coup movement are more rhetorical in their support.”

author
Former US ambassador to Myanmar
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“It would be extremely unwise for North Korea to conduct a seventh nuclear test. We must respond consistently, and in lockstep with each other. China can and must exercise influence to stop North Korea from developing weapons. What is sure is that China has the capability to influence North Korea, and China has the responsibility to engage in the process.”

author
President of South Korea
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“Given that South Korea and the United States are conducting a combined air exercise, regarded as the strongest deterrence against the North Korean threats, the missile launch during the ongoing drills indicates the North has strong confidence in its nuclear capability. Since Sept. 25, North Korea has kept firing missiles ― even during China's important party congress. In addition, the North had staged military provocations in consideration of South Korea's domestic situation to some extent, but the missile launch during the South's mourning period of the Itaewon crowd crush, means that it will only focus on gaining recognition as a nuclear weapons state without taking anything into consideration before holding negotiations with the U.S. on the nuclear issue. To this end, North Korea is widely expected to ratchet up tensions further on the peninsula.”

author
Professor of North Korean studies at Ewha Womans University
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“As a first step, we'd really like to have a conversation with them about each other's doctrines, about crisis communication, crisis management. We're not in that space with Beijing yet. So, there's work to be done to begin the conversation, we think bilaterally. We're now at the 60th anniversary of the Cuban missile crisis. We don't need to repeat that to know that we need to be at the table having conversations with each other.”

author
Deputy assistant secretary of state for arms control, verification and compliance
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“There's been a lot of debates between experts about whether drones will be used in more advanced fights, like a potential US-China conflict. These examples [in Ukraine] are evidence that drones will be used extensively even by more advanced military powers. We're seeing the military value in using large amounts of mass drones, so a logical response would be 'Well, how do we make this more effective? How can we integrate this with other communications, make it more dynamic, make it more precise?' The technology is certainly going in a direction where these are the future of war.”

author
Policy fellow at the Schar School of Policy and Government who researches unconventional weapons and technology
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“Even the concessions that North Korea would want, I think, are very much unclear at the moment. It's quite possible that the North Koreans are simply… they see the current moment as a great moment of geopolitical realignment in the world with Russia's war against Ukraine, and systemic rivalry between the US and China. And they might have calculated that instead of pursuing negotiations with the United States and trying to revisit that relationship, which they've been trying to revisit for now, really 30 years, their cause is better served by simply doubling down on their relationships with Russia and China.”

author
Stanton Senior Fellow in the Nuclear Policy Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace
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“This will set the Chinese back years. China isn't going to give up on chipmaking … but this will really slow them [down].”

author
Technology and cybersecurity expert at the Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS)
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“The war in Ukraine means that North Korea will be able to test all sorts of weapons ― hypersonic missiles, submarine-launched systems, nuclear weapons and of course ICBMs ― and pay no penalty as Washington is distracted while Russia and China are unwilling to help. The Kim Jong-un regime will certainly test as much as they can during this unique time period, driving Washington and its allies to increase their own military capabilities. That means not only are we in for an arms race in Northeast Asia, but the stage is set for Japan and South Korea to actively consider developing and deploying their own nuclear weapons. We are far beyond a simple arms race at this point.”

author
Senior director of Korean Studies at the Center for the National Interest
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“If Kim Jong Un were to carry out this test during the Communist Party Congress, it would be considered a real slap against China. To the extent that they do it, it would be more around the US elections because, North Korea is more concerned about a US response at this moment.”

author
Beijing-based political analyst
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“I said: 'If you think that Americans and others will continue to invest in China based on your violating the sanctions that have been imposed on Russia, I think you're making a gigantic mistake. But that's your decision to make'. The call was not to threaten the Chinese president but to warn about the consequences of ignoring Western sanctions. Thus far, there's no indication they've put forward weapons or other things that Russia has wanted.”

author
President of the United States
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“We will witness the formation of a new bloc to counterweight the US, but not a 'Russia-centric' one, as the Kremlin tries to present in, but in the format of 'Beijing and its comrade's'.”

author
Belarusian analyst based in Ukraine
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“Even before the war, Russia needed China more than China needed Russia. After the war began, this dependence only got stronger. Russia is completely cut off from the global technologies market, and only China is left.”

author
Expert on China-Central Asia relations at the Carnegie Moscow Center
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“The potential imposition of sanctions on China is a far more complex exercise than sanctions on Russia, given US and allies' extensive entanglement with the Chinese economy.”

author
Former senior US Commerce Department official
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“The US has provided weaponry to Taiwan for many, many decades, but the timing of the new sale had political or public relations value coming amid heightened tensions between Taipei and Beijing. To be frank this sale is relatively small. The bulk of the sale is related to the maintenance of existing radar facilities. China is likely to respond, and has already started with statements. Beijing could also launch more incursions in Taiwan's air defence identification zone, start new military exercises, ban certain Taiwanese products from being imported to China, impose sanctions against US and Taiwanese government officials, or take action against US companies doing business in China. So China always has the options, of using any of those tools. It won't stop this particular weapons sale though.”

author
Asia political risk analyst based in Taipei
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“They repeatedly ignored our warnings to leave and we had no choice but to exercise self-defence and shoot. This is the most appropriate reaction after repeated restraint and warnings. China should exercise restraint. We will never provoke, and we will do the most appropriate thing to protect our land and our people.”

author
Premier of Taiwan
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“It's very important for Beijing to show to the US that it has levers to pressure America and its global interests. The joint manoeuvres with Moscow, including the naval drills, are intended to signal that if the pressure on Beijing continues it will have no other choice but to strengthen the military partnership with Russia. It will have a direct impact on the interests of the US and its allies, including Japan.”

author
Senior fellow at the Moscow Carnegie Center
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“The current (Yoon Suk-yeol) government has this last opportunity for denuclearization. Perhaps, we have already missed it. North Korea perceives the current situation as a new Cold War and has strengthened relations with China and Russia … This means that North Korea's need for U.S. security guarantees and, therefore, reasons for abandoning its nuclear weapons will decrease.”

author
Professor of political science and international relations at Seoul National University
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“When you look at Russia, it has the first, second and third highest reserves globally of practically everything. From energy to diamonds, to fresh water, to rare earths and other minerals, it's an extremely rich country. And despite its current estrangement from the West, the Kremlin was far from being geopolitically isolated. Russia has some powerful friends, such as China, India, and Iran, and some increasingly powerful acquaintances, such as Saudi Arabia, Turkey, Brazil, and much of Africa. On balance, therefore, I suspect that Russia will prevail.”

author
Founder of Dezan Shira & Associates, a pan-Asian investment consulting firm
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“The high north is strategically important for Euro-Atlantic security. The shortest path to North America for Russian missiles and bombers would be over the North Pole. This makes NORAD's [North American Aerospace Defense Command] role vital for North America and therefore also for NATO. Beijing and Moscow have pledged to intensify practical cooperation in the Arctic. This forms part of the deepening strategic partnership that challenges our values and our interests. NATO must respond with an increased presence in the far north and investment in new capabilities. Climate change is making the high north more important because the ice is melting and it's becoming more accessible both for economic activity and for military activity.”

author
Secretary General of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
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“This agreement is an important development for the global economy and our U.S. capital markets, which remain preeminent largely because of their ability to balance investor protections and access to the world's leading companies.”

author
President of the New York Stock Exchange
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