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  • Igor Grosu
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  • Maia Sandu
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  • Igor Dodon
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  • Ben Hodges
    Ben Hodges “Since the fall of Avdiivka in Ukraine's east on February 17 [2024], its forces have oozed forward, swallowing several villages, as Ukrainian forces have performed tactical retreats. Here we are in April [2024], and [the Russians] are oozing out. Why is that? I think it's because that's the best the Russians can do. They do not have the capability to knock Ukraine out of the war. Russia lacked the ability to equip large armoured formations that could move rapidly, with supporting artillery, engineers and logistics. I don't think it exists. That's why I feel fairly confident that the mission for [Ukrainian] general Oleksandr Syrskyi for the next several months is to stabilise this as much as he can to buy time for Ukraine to grow the size of the army, to rebuild the defence industry of Ukraine, as well as give us time to find more ammunition for them. I think of 2024 as a year of industrial competition. So the army has got to buy time.” 8 hours ago
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Yemen

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive related to Yemen.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Lack of food today, tomorrow, is not a big problem. It's the cumulative impact that is a big problem, because that's where destitution starts to settle in. The bigger concern is that the international community had not yet responded to 2024 food aid needs. And every day that they delay, every day it will get worse.”

author
UNICEF representative to Yemen
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“Yemen will continue to sink more British ships, and any repercussions or other damages will be added to Britain's bill. It is a rogue state that attacks Yemen and partners with America in sponsoring ongoing crimes against civilians in Gaza.”

author
Deputy foreign minister in the Houthi-led government
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“The Americans and the British must realise that Yemen's position will not change and will not break. Rather, Yemen is becoming more steadfast and adhering to its position. It is escalating its operations against Israeli ships or those heading to the ports of occupied Palestine until the aggression stops and the siege on the Gaza Strip is lifted.”

author
Houthi official
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“Even if the U.N.-led process does move forward, it would likely lead to essentially an agreement between Saudi Arabia and the Houthis that doesn't solve the underlying conflict between the Houthis and the anti-Houthi forces.”

author
Associate policy researcher at the RAND Corporation
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“The escalation in the Red Sea has resulted in the direct suspension of a deal that was anticipated to be announced in recent months. The U.N.-led political discussions are presently at a standstill.”

author
Senior Yemen analyst at the International Crisis Group
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“Hezbollah had in particular helped the Houthis to build their naval capabilities. These include seven naval bases and 30 control posts along Yemen's coast that have radar and electro-optical directors for better control of missile launches. It's a massive coastal defense line for detection, and they're also using AIS (ship tracking) systems, and also intelligence from Iran. Among the unused weapons in the Houthis arsenal are Iranian-made Sadaf floating mines. While such munitions are relatively unsophisticated and easy to deploy, their impact on merchant shipping would be considerable if they were used in the Red Sea.”

author
Former senior official with Israel's intelligence services until 2017 now working at Bar Ilan University's Begin-Sadat Center for Strategic Studies
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“Whether the strikes will in fact deter further attacks on shipping will depend on how the Houthis respond. Is this the hill they want to die on? They were doing well, they have been able to survive the last eight years, have expanded their power, but now they are inviting air strikes from the world's most powerful military.”

author
Middle East security expert at Britain's Royal United Services Institute
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“Our position will not change in the direction of the Palestinian issue, whether a naval alliance is established or not. Only Israeli ships or those going to Israel would be targeted. Our position in support of Palestine and the Gaza Strip will remain until the end of the siege, the entry of food and medicine, and our support for the oppressed Palestinian people will remain continuous.”

author
Houthi official
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“The Houthi - and by extension their main military backer Iran - are probably using their strike capability in the Red Sea to further exercise greater geopolitical influence in the region, in addition to influence on Israel's war in Gaza.”

author
Associate Director and Head of Desk, Country Risk – Middle East and North Africa, S&P Global Market Intelligence
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“The fact that we are turning the page on the past and that all these groups are coming together, and the Saudi aid and investment … the stars are aligning a little on Yemen. Let's hope they bear fruit.”

author
Political science professor at the American University in Washington, DC
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“I think it's just strategic exhaustion, the Houthis for a long time have felt that their success was inevitable, but they had a huge setback in Marib [city], which has been besieged for over a year… At the same time, you see an expansion into Saudi Arabia and Abu Dhabi…I think both sides realised, this war is not going the way we want to, maybe we're going to have to settle for half a loaf.”

author
Non-resident Senior Fellow at the Gulf International Forum
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“You must take that momentum in order to make sure that this truce is fully respected and that it is renewed and … that a true political process is launched. This demonstrates that even when things look impossible when there is the will to compromise, peace becomes possible.”

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Secretary-general of the United Nations
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“The parties accepted to halt all offensive military air, ground and maritime operations inside Yemen and across its borders; they also agreed for fuel ships to enter into Hodeidah ports and commercial flights to operate in and out of Sanaa airport to predetermined destinations in the region.”

author
UN special envoy for Yemen
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“Recent Houthi advances in and around Marib were posing a growing threat to [the UAE's] interests; this led the UAE to push the [UAE-backed] Giants Brigades to move from the west coast, where they are based, and to confront Houthi advances. The UAE was careful not to lose face, but I would expect that in the future, they will try to avoid direct and large scale confrontation, as much as possible, between militias it supports and the Houthis. It will try to continue focusing on building influence in the south, and avoid confrontation with the Houthis. But that is a difficult balance to strike.”

author
Associate professor at the University of Ottawa
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“The situation is becoming more dangerous because the nature of weapons being used in the attacks is becoming more deadly. The Houthis are trying to bring pressure to the Saudi-UAE coalition to bring things to a favorable close. The only way this [conflict] is going to be resolved is if the Saudi, the Emirates and Houthis sit directly to together and work things out. There isn't any alternative because neither side has been able to gain an advantage over the other.”

author
Senior fellow at the Middle East Institute
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“The headquarters of international companies in the UAE will be targets of attacks in the coming period. We hit specific and important targets in the Emirate of Abu Dhabi with a number of ballistic missiles, as well as sensitive targets in the Emirate of Dubai with a number of Samad-3 drones. The Yemeni armed forces confirm that the UAE enemy state will remain unsafe as long as the tools of the Israeli enemy remain in Abu Dhabi and Dubai, launching aggression against our dear country.”

author
Military spokesman of the Houthi
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“There are many bodies still at the scene of the airstrike, many missing people. It is impossible to know how many people have been killed. It seems to have been a horrific act of violence.”

author
Head of Doctors Without Borders’ mission in Yemen
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“It would be silly for the Houthis to leave all areas in Yemen to use the Sanaa airport as it is under 24 hours monitoring by Saudi backed forces. It was silly to see al-Malki [Saudi General Turki al-Malki] talking about what he called 'outside intervention' of parties outside of Yemen - as he said Hezbollah and Iran - but we see at the back [at the press conference] flags of 12 countries that are involved in the war.”

author
Journalist and political commentator based in Yemen capital Sanaa
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“The Yemen conflict has just hit another shameful milestone: 10,000 children have been killed or maimed since fighting started in March 2015. That's the equivalent of four children every day.”

author
Unicef spokesperson
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“Most of the fighters advancing towards Marib are from Marib province. [The Houthis] are mainly using fighters from the area that they are going to liberate, and this sends a good message. If all the people there were against the [Houthis], I don't think they could advance one metre.”

author
Yemeni political analyst aligned with the Houthi movement
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“It is difficult to know who controls what in Yemen, but the central government is formally in charge of Shabwah and should be held responsible for the lack of security and services over there.”

author
Lawyer in international humanitarian law
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“There is no government military strategy. These government offensives are usually an attempt to increase activity on a front line, alleviate popular discontent, or get more funding. No decision has been taken to push for victory, that is very clear. Instead, most offensives are merely aimed at presenting an image to the media, and lifting the morale of the troops. The government would need to completely change its leadership in order to change its military performance. The leadership, led by President Abd-Rabbu Mansour Hadi, was part of Saleh's [Ali Abdullah Saleh] corrupt system. He is a man who was the silent vice president between 1994 and 2011, and is used to doing nothing. The Houthis do not need to control the whole country to win, just the areas they currently control, where most of the Yemeni population live. Can they do more? Possibly. But a total victory would be difficult, and the country would prove impossible to govern.”

author
Yemeni researcher
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“Famine has now arrived to add to the tragedy of Yemen. It is logical therefore and it has been incumbent for the parties now more than ever to stop the fighting and silence the guns.”

author
United Nations Special Envoy for Yemen
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“The Houthis are saying that they are responding to the latest escalation in the area with intense Saudi-led coalition strikes targeting Houthi positions in Sanaa. At the same time, by the end of this month, we will be commemorating the sixth anniversary of the Saudi-led coalition against the Houthis. The attack yesterday, deeper into Saudi Arabia, targeting vital refineries … is a message by the Houthis that they are far from being defeated and that they will continue to gain ground and expand their military influence.”

author
Al Jazeera’s journalist
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“An assault on the city [of Marib] would put two million civilians at risk, with hundreds of thousands potentially forced to flee - with unimaginable humanitarian consequences. Now is the time to de-escalate, not to add even more to the misery of the Yemeni people.”

author
UN undersecretary-general for humanitarian affairs
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“Yemen is on the brink of a catastrophic food security crisis. If the war doesn’t end now, we are nearing an irreversible situation and risk losing an entire generation of Yemen’s young children. Acute malnutrition among children is hitting the highest levels we have seen since the war started.”

author
UN’s humanitarian coordinator for Yemen
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“Riyadh and Abu Dhabi do not agree 100 percent on how things should be moved. [And] it's not only those two countries that can decide the situation in Yemen. They also need the international community on board, including the United Nations, Iran. But none of these players have confidence in [Saudi and the UAE]. There is no long-term vision. There are different parties with different agendas and no agreement on where things should go.”

author
Director of the Gulf Studies Center in Doha, Qatar
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