IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Volker Türk
    Volker Türk “Russia's full-scale armed attack on Ukraine, which is about to enter its third year with no end in sight, continues to cause serious and widespread human rights violations, destroying lives and livelihoods. The invasion has exacted a horrific human cost, inflicting immense suffering on millions of civilians.” 1 hour ago
  • Tymofiy Mylovanov
    Tymofiy Mylovanov “In 2022, the [US] administration [of Joe Biden] submitted funding requests in the spring, almost immediately after the invasion. But in 2023, it waited until mid-fall to announce what it plans to submit. Avdiivka demonstrates the cost of these political delays: human lives, lost territory, and encouraged Russia. If that's the plan 'to be with Ukraine as long as it takes', then the US delays in aid have just prolonged the war.” 3 hours ago
  • Dmytro Kuleba
    Dmytro Kuleba “The era of peace in Europe is over. And every time Ukrainian soldiers withdraw from a Ukrainian town because of the lack of ammunition, think of it not only in terms of democracy and defending the world-based order, but also in terms of Russian soldiers getting a few kilometres closer to your towns.” 3 hours ago
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Qatar

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive related to Qatar.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Doha is very optimistic about progress in the nuclear talks to achieve peace and stability in the Gulf region. We hope an agreement that satisfies all parties and guarantees Iran's right to peaceful use of nuclear energy will be reached as soon as possible.”

author
Spokesman for Qatar’s foreign affairs ministry
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“We are maxed out as far as we have given all our customers their due quantities. I am unhappy about gas prices being high. The lesson is more long-term deals. Even if I can benefit from short-term spikes like this, I don't like it because it is destructive to demand, it hurts my customer and my customer needs to be healthy for me to be healthy.”

author
Minister of Energy in Qatar, and the President and CEO of Qatar Petroleum
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“What we've seen so far … is quite an active presence of voters. There is excitement among nationals who are able to vote in these elections. The [Shura Council] body has been mainly a consultative one over the past few decades but there has been a push within Qatar to share responsibility, to widen participation, to develop the relationship between the citizen and the state. Through that came the idea or the push to make this body one that people are able to stand in, vote in and to give more powers. This is akin to other countries' parliament in that it can draft laws, can question and even sack ministers.”

author
Al Jazeera’s journalist reporting from Doha
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“The vote will not transform the country into a democracy. But at least we can view it as a step in that direction, with these elections further gravitating Qatar towards a more representative system of governance.”

author
CEO and founder of the geopolitical risk consulting firm Gulf State Analytics
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“We see that women are engaged in the political process both as candidates and as voters and this should not come as a surprise given that Qatar was the GCC [Gulf Cooperation Council] country in which a woman, Sheikha Jufairi, won an elected race for the first time, back in the 2003 elections for the Central Municipal Council.”

author
Research fellow at the James A Baker III Institute for Public Policy at Rice University
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“Qatari women are going through a foundational experiment in order to push society towards greater acceptance of Qatari women in the electoral site, after they have proven their worth in their appointed positions in the Shura Council, the Council of Ministers and other leadership positions.”

author
Candidate to the Qatar's Shura Council
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“Qatar's attempt to establish citizen participation in government could have been a moment to celebrate, but it has been tarnished by denying many Qataris their full citizenship rights and repressing critics of arbitrary voter disenfranchisement. The new laws have only reminded Qataris that they are not all equal.”

author
Deputy Director, Middle East and North Africa Division, Human Rights Watch
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