IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Volker Türk
    Volker Türk “Russia's full-scale armed attack on Ukraine, which is about to enter its third year with no end in sight, continues to cause serious and widespread human rights violations, destroying lives and livelihoods. The invasion has exacted a horrific human cost, inflicting immense suffering on millions of civilians.” 3 hours ago
  • Tymofiy Mylovanov
    Tymofiy Mylovanov “In 2022, the [US] administration [of Joe Biden] submitted funding requests in the spring, almost immediately after the invasion. But in 2023, it waited until mid-fall to announce what it plans to submit. Avdiivka demonstrates the cost of these political delays: human lives, lost territory, and encouraged Russia. If that's the plan 'to be with Ukraine as long as it takes', then the US delays in aid have just prolonged the war.” 5 hours ago
  • Dmytro Kuleba
    Dmytro Kuleba “The era of peace in Europe is over. And every time Ukrainian soldiers withdraw from a Ukrainian town because of the lack of ammunition, think of it not only in terms of democracy and defending the world-based order, but also in terms of Russian soldiers getting a few kilometres closer to your towns.” 5 hours ago
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Wagner mutiny - Considerations

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive related to the Context Wagner mutiny - Considerations.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Prigozhin's rebellion - that was the strongest blow to the legitimacy of the leadership. And where does legitimacy come from? From the people. Therefore, the desire to throw oneself into the people and feel you are supported, it's the kind of need that arises against the backdrop of a rebellion.”

author
Senior fellow at the Carnegie Russia Eurasia Center
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“I believe that the indolent response of the elite, when Putin needed their support the most, speaks volumes. Out of the 83 Russian regions, not more than 10 governors publicly spoke in support of Putin. The governor of Moscow, Sergey Sobyanin, and the prime minister of Russia, Mikhail Mishustin, were completely silent during the mutiny. We have seen oligarchs like Vladimir Potanin and Arkady Rotenberg, who is very close to Putin, immediately fly away from the country while the mutiny was taking place. We must understand that the rational, technocratic parts of Putin's elites aren't disillusioned by the lack of democracy and human rights violations in Russia or war crimes in Ukraine - they are afraid that they won't have a secure future alongside Putin anymore. Prigozhin's action could only have cemented this feeling.”

author
Political Scientist
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“We are seeing their weakness, which we so badly need. The weaker Russia is, and the more its bosses fear mutinies and uprisings, the more they will fear to irritate us. Russia's weakness will make it safe for others.”

author
President of Ukraine
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“The mutiny we saw at the weekend demonstrates that there are cracks and divisions within the Russian system. At the same time, it is important to underline that these are internal Russian matters.”

author
Secretary General of North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO)
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“Prigozhin's mutiny may have briefly made Putin look weak, but the fact that a very tangible threat of civil war has been averted trumps it all. Instead of causing disillusionment with the regime, it may in fact rally the nation behind the president.”

author
Freelance journalist based in Riga
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“Of course this doesn't mean that problems have dissipated. It's not fine actually because Putin called on the Wagner fighters to join the defence ministry - and they're not doing it. They are still there with their weapons, they are well organised, they're the best fighting force in the land right now. And what will be their next move is not clear. Right now, they most likely feel threatened. They didn't disappear.”

author
Moscow-based military analyst
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“The courage and self-sacrifice of the fallen heroes-pilots saved Russia from tragic, devastating consequences. I thank all the soldiers and intelligence-service staff who stood in the way of the mutineers. The organisers of the mutiny who betrayed the country also betrayed those who were on their side.”

author
President of Russia
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“The current unravelling of the seeming Russian political stability reflects the internal pressures and the fault lines of a country that waged an unjust and disastrous war with its neighbour. The war produced the inter-elite pressures, blame-shifting games and the entitlement-carrying actors who have now openly clashed, thereby moving the military action inside Russia.”

author
Professor of Russian politics at King’s College London
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“Among the few remaining sources of authority for the Putin regime was his longstanding claim that he restored 'law and order' after the 'chaotic' 1990s. This perception will now lie in tatters and leave him much more vulnerable over the longer term, even if he eventually prevails.”

author
Lecturer at the University of Exeter in the United Kingdom
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