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IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Igor Grosu
    Igor Grosu “The plebiscite is a chance for Moldovans to show loudly and clearly that we are Europeans. ... We are not entering Europe, we are returning to it.” 6 hours ago
  • Maia Sandu
    Maia Sandu “Joining the EU is the best thing we can give this and future generations.” 6 hours ago
  • Igor Dodon
    Igor Dodon “We are categorically opposed to this referendum. We are not saying 'no' to talks with the EU and we are not opposed to the EU. We oppose Sandu using it as an instrument for her own interests and those of her party. We are therefore asking voters during the campaign not to take part in the referendum.” 6 hours ago
  • Ben Hodges
    Ben Hodges “Since the fall of Avdiivka in Ukraine's east on February 17 [2024], its forces have oozed forward, swallowing several villages, as Ukrainian forces have performed tactical retreats. Here we are in April [2024], and [the Russians] are oozing out. Why is that? I think it's because that's the best the Russians can do. They do not have the capability to knock Ukraine out of the war. Russia lacked the ability to equip large armoured formations that could move rapidly, with supporting artillery, engineers and logistics. I don't think it exists. That's why I feel fairly confident that the mission for [Ukrainian] general Oleksandr Syrskyi for the next several months is to stabilise this as much as he can to buy time for Ukraine to grow the size of the army, to rebuild the defence industry of Ukraine, as well as give us time to find more ammunition for them. I think of 2024 as a year of industrial competition. So the army has got to buy time.” 8 hours ago
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Russia politics

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive related to the Context Russia politics.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Several factors contributed to achieving this surreal result: the intense brainwashing through Russian state media that channel the Kremlin's toxic propaganda; vote-buying through the expansion of the welfare state and various social benefits on the eve of the election; and ballot stuffing and rigging through the opaque early voting and electronic voting systems.”

author
Freelance journalist based in Riga
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“This is a record figure. The turnout is a record - an unprecedented 77.44 percent. This has never happened in the history of the new Russia. We proved to ourselves that we are an independent nation … and in the face of the West we showed that we are united. We are proud of this.”

author
Russia electoral chief
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“No matter who or how much they want to intimidate us, no matter who or how much they want to suppress us, our will, our consciousness - no one has ever succeeded in anything like this in history. It has not worked now and will not work in the future. Never.”

author
President of Russia
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“The deep split within the totalitarian reality is manifested through the way Putin fanatically clings to the necessity of extending his endless cadences through 'election' while fully neutering the very essence of competition and open ending. In Russia, they consider elections as the most prestigious way to legitimise power. But totalitarian reality doesn't generate any prestige. It only generates fear and submissiveness.”

author
Vice president of the Association of Political Psychologists, a group in Kyiv
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“The low turnout of Putin's electorate could play in favour of the opposition's plan, but only if the anti-Putin electorate mobilises to show up at polling stations. One of the main obstacles to that is the perception among many antiwar Russian citizens that the election is just a spectacle and there is no sense in participating in it. If this reluctance to vote is overcome, then, we may well witness a protest vote significant enough to dent Putin's legitimacy claims, which could dampen the war fervour and plant a seed of doubt in the political elite.”

author
Former Russian diplomat
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“Domestically, Putin is poised to prioritise addressing Russia's demographic challenges, a longstanding focus of legislative efforts. On the foreign policy front, Russia is likely to persist in its opposition to what the Kremlin perceives as a unipolar global order dominated by the United States. On the Ukraine war front Putin is committed to continuing the war. From a military standpoint, there is little indication of a shift in the overarching strategy, although some refinements may be made regarding the roles of specific branches of the Russian armed forces, notably the Black Sea Fleet. Russian forces might adopt a gradual territorial expansion approach, particularly focusing on northern regions such as Kharkiv … and southern areas like Odesa.”

author
Postdoctoral researcher in the War Studies Department at King’s College London
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“I don't know who exactly decided [that] about me, but I know exactly the reason … because my election rating, the number of people who are ready to vote for me grows 5 percent a week. [The] official understanding is that all the society is for Putin, for [the] special military operation as we call it, but it's not so. Majority of people in Russia want the conflict in Ukraine to stop.”

author
Russian opposition politician and 2024 Russia’s presidential hopeful
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“I collected more than 200,000 signatures across Russia. We conducted the collection openly and honestly - the queues at our headquarters and collection points were watched by the whole world. Taking part in the presidential election in 2024 is the most important political decision of my life. I am not giving up on my intentions.”

author
Russian opposition politician and 2024 Russia’s presidential hopeful
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“The current unravelling of the seeming Russian political stability reflects the internal pressures and the fault lines of a country that waged an unjust and disastrous war with its neighbour. The war produced the inter-elite pressures, blame-shifting games and the entitlement-carrying actors who have now openly clashed, thereby moving the military action inside Russia.”

author
Professor of Russian politics at King’s College London
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“Over the course of Putin's 23-year rule, the country doesn't know a word of truth about the physical and emotional condition of the person ruling over it. We can affirm that by his current presidential term, the Russian leader is not in good health.”

author
Russian journalist - Proekt editor-in-chief
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“The dictatorial measures will not be sufficient to retain power … and at some point, the Russian government would need to start buying the loyalty of Russian citizens or subjugated Ukrainians, Belarusians with a more Keynesian redistributionist economic policy. Politics will also have to be reorganised to pave the way for the establishment of a party with a mass membership, able to rally the population around Putin's figure and imperialist ideology. It would not look exactly like fascism but the regime would be more mobilisationist.”

author
Ukrainian sociologist and research associate at the Institute of East European Studies, Freie Universität Berlin
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“This war, if it is unleashed, will become an indelible stain on the history of Russia. It will not be forgotten and not forgiven for centuries. Our authorities say that Russians and Ukrainians are one people. In fact, almost all of us have relatives and friends in Ukraine. But Russia and Ukraine must respect each other's sovereignty. Russia has already violated this principle by annexing Crimea and intervening in the Donbas. We, the citizens of Russia, are responsible for this. We must finally learn at least one commandment and stop killing our own kind.”

author
Mathematician and leading member of Russia’s oldest human rights NGO Memorial
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“There is no political counterbalance to [Russian President] Vladimir Putin and his policies in the system of Russian state power today. All five parties in the State Duma … support his aggressive policy against Ukraine. The statement of politicians, cultural figures and human rights activists of Russia against the preparation for a war in Ukraine responded to a real public need. I signed [the letter] without fear. Public leaders should say these fundamental things when the authorities of the country are going crazy and endangering people's lives.”

author
Russian politician and member of the liberal Yabloko party
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“The Duma will have to prove its effectiveness to its bosses. And this new effectiveness, a deputy's key performance indicators, are more made-up repressive laws, more idiotic laws. And that is exactly how the system will continue to work. We need to brace ourselves for a quite difficult period, even considering that the last year was extremely difficult.”

author
Analyst at the Carnegie Moscow Center
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“These were opaque elections. We didn't have direct video feeds like we had during the [2018] presidential election and the last federal elections. And we have seen what serious obstacles election monitors have been facing.”

author
Analyst at the independent election-monitoring group Golos
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“Ten years ago, a truly massive election observer cadre appeared on the scene. Around five years ago, Russian nonprofits and politicians learned to fundraise to such an extent that an entire class of civil society, not just a handful of organizations, could survive. 2019 saw the first mass protests against denied candidate registrations, not just in the aftermath of rigged elections. Now the state is starting to lose its monopoly of the media space, coercion is becoming ineffective, support from previously loyal electorates is fading out, and new politicians are replacing those who were jailed or forced to emigrate. The toughened election laws thus appear to be the regime's attempt to roll back the oncoming tide of public dissatisfaction.”

author
Co-chairman of the independent election-monitoring group Golos
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“We are living through a moment when the Kremlin is losing unambiguous control over the minds of voters. We are seeing how voters are experiencing growing anger at what we might call the status quo. People want change.”

author
Moscow-based analyst
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