IPSE'S AUTHORS LAST 24h
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IPSEs IN THE LAST 24H
  • Carl Bildt
    Carl Bildt “The situation looks increasingly precarious for Russian forces in Lyman as Ukrainian forces are about to cut them off. Another painful defeat for the Russian invasion forces is looming.” 8 hours ago
  • António Guterres
    António Guterres “Any decision to proceed with the annexation of Donetsk, Luhansk, Kherson and Zaporizhia regions of Ukraine would have no legal value and deserves to be condemned. I want to underscore that the so-called referenda were conducted during active armed conflict in areas under Russian occupation and outside Ukraine's legal and constitutional framework. They cannot be called genuine expression of the popular will.” 8 hours ago
  • Pao-Lin Tien
    Pao-Lin Tien “For the US, if inflation does not show signs of cooling in the last few months of 2022, and measures of inflation expectations start to climb, it would force the Federal Reserve to continue with aggressive rate hikes beyond 2022 into the spring of 2023 - in my opinion that's when the economy will tip into a recession. I think a similar situation would apply to other countries as well, if central banks are forced to increase rates aggressively and persistently, either to defend their currency or to tame inflation, then a recession is inevitable.” 17 hours ago
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Society

Page with all the IPSEs stored in the archive with Category Society.
The IPSEs are presented in chronological order based on when the IPSEs have been pronounced.

“Pierre [Poilievre] is a career politician who has been collecting a six-figure salary on the public's dime since he was 24, and he's spent every minute of his time in office fighting against fair wages, good pensions and a better life for working people. He is not a worker, and he definitely doesn't get what it means to be a member of the working class.”

author
CUPE (Canadian Union of Public Employees) national president
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“She always put duty first, long after others of her generation had retired. When she became queen, people anticipated a new Elizabethan age of peace and prosperity. Such optimism was justified, with decades of great change and mostly rising living standards. During her long life, she weathered many storms. Elizabeth II mostly stood apart from controversy in the royal family - particularly in her later years - and will justly be remembered as one of the best-loved monarchs of the modern period.”

author
Historian
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“Writing books for children is not a crime, and attempting to educate children about recent events in Hong Kong's history does not constitute an attempt to incite rebellion.”

author
Amnesty International’s China campaigner
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“We hope that responsible officials of the two sides will meet in person as soon as possible for a candid discussion on humanitarian matters including the issue of separated families.”

author
South Korea Unification Minister
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“Vietnam's ruling party to be one of the most thin-skinned governments in the region when it comes to public criticism. A noodle seller mocking the Minister's ridiculously expensive steak on a gov't trip is funny, not criminal. Mockery is a legitimate form of expression that should not be considered a crime.”

author
Deputy Asia Director, Human Rights Watch
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“A leader more open to influence or subject to greater checks would not likely have implemented such a draconian policy [spring 2022 lockdown in Shanghai], or at least would have corrected course once its costs and unpopularity became evident. But for Xi, backtracking would have been an unthinkable admission of error.”

author
Retired professor at the Communist Party’s top academy
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“We have a deal. Under the EU-facilitated Dialogue, Serbia agreed to abolish entry/exit documents for Kosovo ID holders and Kosovo agreed to not introduce them for Serbian ID holders. Kosovo Serbs, as well as all other citizens, will be able to travel freely between Kosovo & Serbia using their ID cards. The EU just received guarantees from PM [Albin] Kurti to this end.”

author
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“The most important thing is about the timing. It's important to know why this war resumed right now. The Addis Ababa government must have known that Tigrayan forces are at their weakest point. The organisation and relaunch of war is important.”

author
Assistant Professor at James Madison University
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“So far, there are no signs that the drop in living standards could lead to unrest. The living standards decline has not reached the point where attitudes towards reality start to change significantly and the fridge clearly begins to beat the TV.”

author
Founder of social studies think tank Platforma
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“Sixty-four years ago during the Aug. 23 battle, our soldiers and civilians operated in solidarity and safeguarded Taiwan, so that we have the democratic Taiwan today. That battle to protect our homeland showed the world that no threat of any kind could shake the Taiwanese people's resolve to defend their nation, not in the past, not now, and not in the future. We too will show the world that the people of Taiwan have both the resolve and confidence to safeguard peace, security, freedom and prosperity for ourselves. As Taiwan stands on the front line of authoritarian expansionism we continue to bolster our defence autonomy, and we will also continue to work with the United States on this front.”

author
President of Taiwan
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“The people of Myanmar have the right to democracy and self-determination free from fear and want, which will only be possible by the good will and efforts of all stakeholders in an inclusive process.”

author
United Nations Special Envoy on Myanmar
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“People in the Democratic People's Republic of Korea no longer live in a cocoon with no information from the world outside. The current generation of North Koreans has experienced the freedom of enterprise and choice - however restricted - offered by the jangmadang informal markets. They watch TV dramas from China and South Korea and do not accept the propaganda, however harsh their lives might be. The regime fears the confluence of a more informed, less unconditionally loyal population, with greater hardships. When loyalty is replaced by fear and the general population suffers increasing hardships, he said, the situation becomes unsustainable. Change is bound to come. We just don't know when, or in what form it will happen.”

author
Founder and chairman of the Global Peace Foundation
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“We can't determine our own politics - if we had a real federation, the head of our republic could say no, Buryats won't fight in this criminal war. But he keeps providing cannon fodder for Putin. Buryatia, like the other ethnic republics, is governed by the colonial policies of Moscow. Our languages and history are disappearing off the face of the Earth, while Moscow sucks all the money and resources out of the provinces. Moscow is a beautiful city but it's such a facade of all of Russia, because if you go just a little further, the houses are falling apart, there are no roads, there's no work. Contractors [soldiers] and their families are always writing to us, saying that they don't want to fight, but there are many obstacles along the way. Some of them are being held back on occupied territories [of Ukraine], and they're pressured, threatened, afraid they'll be sent to the front line to be killed. When they submit their refusal, they're asked 'Who will defend the motherland?' They reply if someone attacks their motherland they'll defend it, but they see no motherland in Ukraine. We know we can't influence Vladimir Putin directly, but the less cannon fodder he has at his disposal, the sooner this war will end.”

author
Leader of the Free Buryatia Foundation
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“Most of the soldiers and officers of the ground forces and the airborne forces come from poor Russian towns and villages. This social-economic stratification has a long-term tradition in the Russian armed forces because young men from the cities with relatively good education serve in other military branches … but the infantry consists of badly-educated soldiers from poor families and regions.”

author
Russia-based expert with the Jamestown Foundation, a think tank in Washington, DC
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“The upbeat result would give the BOK some relief that it can focus on its inflation-targeting mandate for the time being. The main surprise was, of course, stronger than expected consumption, which was mainly driven by the reopening. However, we think that the reopening-boosted spending is expected to lose its initial steam and normalise in the current quarter. And, going forward, consumer's purchasing power is expected to weaken as the faster-than-expected interest rate hikes should put more burden on debt payment and consumer spending, while inflation is expected to accelerate during the current quarter.”

author
Senior economist for South Korea and Japan at ING
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“As the virus pushes at us, we must push back. We're in a much better position than at the beginning of the pandemic. Of course, there's been a lot of progress. We have safe and effective tools that prevent infections, hospitalisations and deaths. However, we should not take them for granted.”

author
Director-General of the World Health Organization
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“There is no way to sugar-coat it. Just about any way you cut it, they're not good. And the Biden White House has got to be very worried about not only potential re-election chances, but his current standing with the American public, which across the board is under water. Even if Biden is not responsible for some of the crises Americans are dealing with, the president is the first person people blame. You get to take credit when the economy is good. And you get blamed when the economy's bad.”

author
Political science professor at The University of Akron in Ohio
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“Often, the heads of different departments and companies attend one meeting in the morning about enhancing dynamic zero, and then in the afternoon a meeting about economic growth. The tensions are within Xi's own model for governing the country. The tensions really arise from him.”

author
Independent political commentator in Beijing
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“The plan also aims to cut the sources of supply for terrorist groups which have created corridors in the eastern part of the country to be able to move to refuel, motorcycle, and ammunition.”

author
Founder of capital Ouagadougou-based geopolitical advisory firm Granada Consulting
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“Sri Lanka will not come out of this crisis for some time. There is a lot of wait and watch, and that is affecting the people. We have not had fuel for days … Just imagine running out of fuel. People cant get to work. Kids can't get to school. The whole economy is at a standstill.”

author
Researcher at Amnesty International
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“We've essentially ground our way back to where we were pre-Covid. So, this doesn't necessarily look like a dire situation, despite the fact that we're struggling with inflation and economic declines in some other dimensions.”

author
Professor of finance at the Kenan-Flagler Business School at the University of North Carolina
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“This is certainly not something we are used to seeing in Tokyo. We never have this kind of gun violence. [We have] one of the lowest rates of homicide in the world. So this comes as a shock to everyone, especially considering the stature of the importance of the victim of Abe Shinzo, one of the most important post-war politicians for Japan. We are hoping for the best, but as of now, given how close range all of this happened, things do not look particularly good.”

author
Professor at Japan’s Temple University
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“The combined pressures of being a Hong Konger and a young person are a potent mix. Many people in their 20s are going through a transitional phase as they begin to think more seriously about their future careers and family prospects. Even before 2019 this was difficult in Hong Kong, where renting - let alone buying - a flat is out of reach for most young people. At the moment they need to consider the future of the city into their own personal plan. If the integration of Hong Kong into the Chinese mainland continues than this city may be facing some fundamental change, so they need to think about migration and especially if the UK and Canada are opening up options for some [university] graduates to move.”

author
Lecturer at Leeds University whose research includes Hong Kong’s cultural history
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“The vague national security law causes considerable uncertainty about acceptable behaviour for international companies. The pressure on the courts that has accompanied enforcement has likely reduced confidence in the rule of law, which has historically been the city's distinguishing characteristic to attract international business. International firms also face pressure to support Beijing's policies while at the same time these companies face pressure in democracies where they operate to not support such repressive policies, at the risk of market exclusion.”

author
Former law professor at the University of Hong Kong
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“The Russian President must accept that there is a community of law-based democracies in his neighbourhood that is growing ever closer together. He clearly fears the spark of democracy spreading to his country.”

author
Chancellor of Germany
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“The Russians were in control of about 70 percent of the city, but have been forced back over the past two days. The city is divided in two. They are afraid to move freely around the city. Ukrainian forces had captured eight Russian prisoners. Russian general Aleksandr Dvornikov has set himself a target of taking full control of Severodonetsk by June 10, or controlling the Lysychansk-Bakhmut road. All of the forces, all of the reserves are concentrating on these two tasks.”

author
Luhansk Governor
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“Russian troops again fired at the border areas of the Sumy region, Mykolaiv, cities and communities of the Zaporizhzhia region, Kharkiv region. The situation in Severodonetsk, where street fighting continues, remains extremely difficult. It is also difficult in Lysychansk, Marinka, Kurakhove, other cities and communities of Donbas. Constant air strikes, artillery and missile fire. As of this morning, the total number of various Russian missiles used against Ukraine is already 2,503. Our heroes hold their positions and do everything to inflict maximum losses on the enemy. I am grateful to each of our defenders who are approaching the day when Russia will have to leave Donbas alone.”

author
President of Ukraine
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“Today, the enemies' most important hope for striking a blow at the country is based on popular protests. They hope to turn the people against the Islamic establishment and the Islamic Republic through psychological work, activities on the internet and cyberspace ... and by spending money and recruiting mercenaries. But the enemies' calculation is as wrong as many earlier ones.”

author
Iran’s Supreme Leader
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“Right now our soldiers have pushed them back. They [the Russians] are suffering huge casualties. The Russian army, as we understand, is throwing all its efforts, all its reserves in that direction. As soon as we get a big amount of Western long-range weapons, we will push their artillery back … and then Russian infantry will run.”

author
Governor of Luhansk region
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“Carbon dioxide is at levels our species has never experienced before - this is not new. We have known about this for half a century, and have failed to do anything meaningful about it. What's it going to take for us to wake up?”

author
Scientist with the Global Monitoring Laboratory at NOAA
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“I told him [Putin ] that he made a historic and fundamental error for his people, for himself and for history. I think he has isolated himself. Isolating oneself is one thing, but being able to get out of it is a difficult path.”

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President of France
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“I regret to say that the Russian army succeeded in making its way deep into the city... they control most of the city. A fifth of the city is now a contested grey zone. Ukrainian fighters are holding out in one area and are still able to clear Russians out of some streets. They had captured six Russian prisoners the previous day. So I would tell sceptics not to write off Sievierodonetsk. It's too early to do that. The city is holding on.”

author
Luhansk Governor
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“The city is essentially being destroyed ruthlessly block by block. Heavy street fighting continues and artillery bombardments threaten the lives of the estimated 13,000 civilians still sheltering in the ruined city. It is impossible to track civilian casualties amid the round-the-clock shelling. Civilians are dying from direct strikes, from fragmentation wounds and under the rubble of destroyed buildings, since most of the inhabitants are hiding in basements and shelters. There are food supplies for several more days, but the issue is how to distribute them.”

author
Mayor of Severodonetsk
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“The major political blocs have the ability to find a solution to the deadlock, but there is no serious will to do so. The option of dissolving the parliament is not serious, as many parliamentarians might not be able to win the seats they did in the last election. As always, Iraqis are the big losers of the political process and the governments that have come since the US invasion of Iraq in 2003. We [Iraqis] are still paying the bill of the current parliamentary failure, and we are entering into an unknown future. It is not logical to solve one problem [deadlock] by creating another problem [dissolving the parliament]. Even if the parliament were dissolved, and a new one elected, what is the guarantee that the next parliament will not have the same problem?”

author
Iraqi political analyst
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“The lack of independence in the court system during the state of exception is a result of the erosion of independent institutions. The process began on May 1 of last year, when members of Bukele's party assumed a supermajority in El Salvador's legislative assembly and immediately moved to remove the attorney general and Supreme Court judges. The Supreme Court has been co-opted completely, and kidnapped by the executive branch. There is no separation of power. It does what the presidential house says.”

author
Salvadoran judge who was transferred to a different court in September 2021 after speaking out against the Bukele administration
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“This is by far the most important leak of evidence from the region and the largest and the most significant. It's much more significant than anything we've seen before because it contains evidence on so many levels.”

author
Senior Fellow in China Studies at Victims of Communism
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“Imagine being 9 years old, and watching your friend get shot through the nose and collapse dead in front of you. The headline, for good reason, is the number of kids dead. But a huge part of the story, in shooting after shooting, is the lifetime of trauma for the survivors.”

author
US Senator - Democrat
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“As a nation we must ask: When in God's name will we stand up to the gun lobby? When in God's name will we do what needs to be done? I'm sick and tired of it. We have to act.”

author
President of the United States
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“Enough is enough. As a nation, we must have the courage to take action and prevent this from ever happening again. It is long past time for our country to stand up to the gun lobby and pass reasonable gun safety laws.”

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US Vice President
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“If it turns out that there is hunger in North Africa … both Spain and the whole of southern Europe will have a huge migration problem. Today we should focus on Ukraine being able to export its grain. Ukraine accounts for about 80 percent of Egypt's demand for grain, and not shipping out grain to the North African region will result in a lot of chaos.”

author
President of Poland
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“A number of citizens here consider Wagner's presence a good thing, especially since their operatives and our army pushed back an assault on our capital, Bangui in January 2021. The appreciation of the Russians is absolutely tied in with anti-French sentiment, similar to what you find in Mali, for instance. France is considered dishonest and unhelpful. There are regular anti-French demonstrations, these are organised by people close to those in power here.”

author
Freelance journalist in the capital Bangui
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“The PKK has been a security threat against Turkey since its foundation. Thousands of people - both civilian and military - lost their lives in the fight against the PKK. So the PKK, and any associated element, would be considered a crucial threat and Turkey expects its allies to understand the security concerns. Of course, Western nations' reluctance to see the PKK and YPG in the same basket is a problem for Turkey. Turkey expected its allies to see the close link between [the PKK and YPG] through the similarities in their organisation, structure and financial resources.”

author
Secretary general at the Istanbul-based Centre for Economics and Foreign Policy Studies
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“It is usual for the Iranian government not to fulfill its responsibilities. It always resorts to harsh methods to crack down on protests by beating them [demonstrators] up, torturing and detaining them. But workers have gotten so poor that they are fighting for their livelihoods, and they do not simply care about crackdowns anymore.”

author
Former employee of the Tehran Bus Company who now lives in Canada
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“The strike has faced the government with a real challenge. Although the government closed down schools and offices, claiming air pollution as the reason, traffic throughout the city was heavily affected. There is a possibility that the strike could spread to include subway and other transportation workers in the city.”

author
Iranian labor activist
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“What we need to understand is that in Libya, through a previous power-sharing agreement, there are two legislative houses. There's the parliament based in eastern Libya, and there's the high council of state in the west. The two legislative bodies are supposed to agree on a new government to replace the unity government of Prime Minister Abdel Hamid Dbeibeh. But the appointment of Bashagha [Fathi Bashagha] raised eyebrows regarding the transparency of the process. There was a lot of scepticism with regards to how transparent the vote was and how legitimate it was. Even the UN support mission voiced concerns that the vote of confidence in Bashagha was flawed. A lot of people see Bashagha as a traitor, who aligned himself with someone who has destroyed their homes and displaced hundreds of thousands of people. I've been talking to security officials and residents in Tripoli and what they're telling me is really that this was a message to those that are supporting Bashagha: You can't just come to Tripoli and assume power.”

author
Al Jazeera's correspondent reporting from Tripoli
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“We affirm that the only solution to the current political impasse is a clear constitutional process on the basis of which elections are held, and in which the Libyan people renew their authority, in a peaceful and transparent manner.”

author
Head of Libya’s High Council of State
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“You should not swallow informational tranquilizers. The situation, frankly speaking, will get worse for us. The desire to defend one's motherland in the sense that it exists in Ukraine - it really does exist there and they intend to fight to the last. The main thing in our business is have a sense of military-political realism: if you go beyond that then the reality of history will hit you so hard that you will not know what hit you. Don't wave rockets in the direction of Finland for goodness sake - it just looks rather funny. The main deficiency of our military-political position is that we are in full geopolitical solitude and - however we don't want to admit it - practically the whole world is against us - and we need to get out of this situation.”

author
Russian military analyst and retired colonel
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“Dealing with the Shabab will be among the first challenges facing Somalia's next government. But the new leader needs also to deliver a new Constitution, reform the economy, deal with climate change, open dialogue with the breakaway region of Somaliland and unite a polarized nation. Governance in Somalia became too confrontational over the past few years. It was like pulling teeth. People are now ready for a new dawn.”

author
Executive director of the Heritage Institute for Policy Studies in Mogadishu
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“While the government is busy with itself, we are suffering. The Shabab are like a mafia group. You either have to obey them or close your business. There's no freedom.”

author
Businessman importing flour and sugar in the Somali capital Mogadishu
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“The country has been testing about 1,400 people each week, which is not nearly enough to survey 350,000 people with symptoms. What is more worrisome is the sheer number of symptomatic people. Using a conservative case fatality rate of 1% and assuming the surge is due to an Omicron variant of COVID-19, North Korea can expect 3,500 deaths from this outbreak.”

author
Lecturer on Global Health and Social Medicine at Harvard Medical School
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“Russia's aviation industry could end up like the one in Iran, which has been able to maintain a fleet of Western-built aircraft using some back-end measures to keep them flying. Russia has a commercially successful aerospace industry that still employs hundreds of thousands of people. It has produced aircraft in the past, so there is a history and infrastructure for designing and producing aircraft engines and aircraft components. It won't be perfect and it would probably result in keeping a skeleton fleet of sorts, but they have a lot of the tools needed to make it work to keep western-built aircraft flying for decades.”

author
Associate at AeroDynamic Advisory, where he is responsible for research and analysis of aviation and aerospace markets
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“It didn't matter which administration was in power, whether it was the left or whether it was the right. Yoon [Yoon Suk-yeol] went after corruption in the system. He has a track record of pursuing justice, no matter what the political cost may be. And in a society that is seen to be largely unfair, where there's deep divisions between the rich and the poor, and where many ordinary people feel as if equal opportunity is not guaranteed, there's hope that he will bring justice to South Korea.”

author
Professor of East Asian Studies at the University of California Irvine in the United States
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“This war is a big nail in the coffin of our enchantment with Russia. They have been very successful in totally turning people off Russia.”

author
Program director for the Center for the Study of Democracy, a research organization in Sofia
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“The military operations of the Ukrainian armed forces around Kharkiv, especially north and northeast of Kharkiv, are sort of a success story. The Ukrainian army was able to push these war criminals to a line beyond the reach of their artillery.”

author
Adviser to Ukrainian Defense Minister Oleksiy Reznikov
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“It's interesting that he spent the few minutes he had chosen to deliver this very important speech to talk about why Russian forces are fighting in Ukraine. A lot of people were expecting a much more rousing and longer speech from the president to get some clarity about when the Russian population could expect an end to this conflict.”

author
Al Jazeera’s journalist reporting from Moscow
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“We can assume that Russia - like almost every warring party - is carrying out so-called screenings: fighters are being arrested, probably also civilians who have worked for the Ukrainian authorities. Both groups are protected under international law, so they may not be tortured or killed, for example. But is this being respected, where do these people end up afterwards? We do not know.”

author
Senior International Committee of the Red Cross official
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“He [Vladimir Putin] will insist that the US and NATO are willing to risk continued violence and economic downturn around the world just to humiliate Russia and limit its power in the international order. Since it is May 9, they will evoke the Great Patriotic War and portray this moment as another when the Russian people must be steadfast and heroic while under attack. Putin's proven himself quite capable of twisting truths and reorganising the narrative in a way that might seem logically unsound but resonates nonetheless. It's not his first rodeo or Russia's with propaganda.”

author
Research fellow at Georgetown’s Center for Security and Emerging Technology
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“After the end of World War II, a large group of Germans believed that if there is stability in the country today, it is because hundreds of thousands of soldiers from the Soviet Union left German territory without firing a single shot. Many in Germany believe that the country owes a certain debt of gratitude to the Kremlin, in turn initiating economic and political partnerships with Russia. But over the years, Germany has failed to realise that Russia is no longer interested in partnership. Russia has been keen to turn the clock back in time to the Soviet era, for quite some time now. Berlin continued to believe in the idea of partnership, even while others had already started to warn Germany that it would probably … pay a price for not abandoning this idea.”

author
Former German ambassador to the United States and chairman of the Munich Security Conference from 2008 to 2022
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“Such lies are intended to accuse the Jews themselves of the most horrific crimes in history that were committed against them. The use of the Holocaust of the Jewish people for political purposes must stop immediately.”

author
Israeli Prime Minister
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“Taiwanese are ready and prepared to defend themselves. Give us something for us to defend ourselves. And speak out in support for Taiwan so that we feel that we are not alone in fighting for ourselves. There's a growing awareness in the international community to care about the situation Taiwan is in. They know that if there's going to be a war in Taiwan, it's going to be a disaster for the rest of the world.”

author
Taiwan’s foreign minister
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“When they say 'What sort of nazification is this if we are Jews', well I think that Hitler also had Jewish origins, so it means nothing. For a long time now we've been hearing the wise Jewish people say that the biggest anti-Semites are the Jews themselves.”

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Russian Foreign Minister
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“Thanks to the new runway we were expecting a colossal influx of tourists from all over the world. Instead, we got a rocket strike. But Odesa is not a city which surrenders to difficulties. We will absolutely restore the runway after our victory and even more tourists will come to us.”

author
Mayor of Odesa
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“I'm very worried where this is going because the current lockdown in Shanghai has been looking like it is going to end after this May holiday which means most people can probably walk around their neighbourhoods but for most factories around the East coast they are not in a very good condition. Taking notice of what is happening in Shanghai, many other cities are taking precautionary measures - even with one COVID case a whole city can be locked down. We might be looking at a situation where 30 cities might be locked down simultaneously. That is hugely disruptive to the supply chain.”

author
Chief economist at Hang Seng Bank
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“I think the decision on Finnish NATO membership was taken on February 24, at five o'clock in the morning, when [Russian President Vladimir] Putin attacked Ukraine. That's when the public opinion basically took a 180 degree turn. From 50 percent against and 20 percent in favour, to 50 percent in favour and 20 percent against. Currently, we are at 68 percent in favour and 12 percent against.”

author
Finland’s former Prime Minister
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“In Moscow it may seem that nothing [bad] is happening. But if you are in the Kaluga region or near St. Petersburg, where there are car assembly plants, everyone there knows that in a couple of months they will be out of work.”

author
Deputy chief economist at the Washington-based Institute of International Finance (IIF)
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“We need to make financial and logistical efforts to build a professional army, modern and well-equipped. We are going through a very difficult period for our country, but investments in the army are very necessary, they are needed for infrastructure, for the security and defence of the state.”

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President of Moldova
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“They have moved to terror - to preparing the murder of our journalists. Another task has come to the fore: to split Russian society and destroy Russia from within. It is not working. Foreign media organisations and social media had been used by the West's spies to confect provocations against Russia's armed forces. Prosecutors should react swiftly to fake news and reports that undermined order. They are often mainly organised from abroad, organised in different ways - either the information comes from there or the money. Prosecutors should fight extremism more actively.”

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President of Russia
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“We are inspired by the resilience of Orthodox Christians in Ukraine in the face of President Putin's brutal war of aggression. We are continuing to support them and, today, we wish them and all others celebrating Easter hope and a swift return to peace.”

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U.S. Secretary of State
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“Unfortunately, Russia rejected the proposal to establish an Easter truce. This shows very well how the leaders of this state actually treat the Christian faith, one of the most joyful and important holidays. But we keep our hope. Hope for peace, hope that life will overcome death.”

author
President of Ukraine
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“In less than two months … we've seen about a quarter of Ukraine's population, more than 12 million people in total, including five million refugees, but also 7.1 million inside the country, have been forced to flee their homes, so this is a staggering amount of people.”

author
Spokesperson for the United Nations Refugee Agency
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“I don't see a single beneficiary of this crazy war! Innocent people and soldiers are dying. Of course there are morons who draw Z, but 10% of any country are morons. 90% of Russians are AGAINST this war! Kremlin officials are shocked that neither they or their children will be off to the Mediterranean in the summer. Businessmen are trying to save the rest of their property. Russian generals, waking up with a hangover, have now realised that they had a shit army. And how could the army be good if everything else in the country is shit and mired in nepotism, sycophancy and servility?”

author
Russian billionaire who founded Tinkoff Bank, Russia’s biggest credit card issuer
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“Russia has enough resources for six months. By the year's end, its gross domestic product (GDP) will shrink by up to 15 percent, and then two to three years of adaptation will follow. In the end, they will have an autarky like that in Iran.”

author
Kyiv-based analyst
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“So, they have three weeks and about 200 kilometres (124 miles) that they will have to cross in the endless springtime steppe crisscrossed with deep ravines and riverbeds, to encircle the Ukrainian forces. Instead, Russia's top brass may decide to leave Donbas alone and concentrate on taking Kharkiv, Ukraine's second-largest city with a predominantly Russian-speaking population that has been bombarded for weeks. It would be 'comfortable' to Putin to report the [takeover of] Kharkiv on May 9.”

author
Research Fellow at Bremen University
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“For two decades, the argument has been that oppression and human rights violations are a necessary evil to ensure economic growth and stability, [but] in the end, Putin's regime has neither. The increasing brutality in Russian society has forced the country's brightest to leave in search for a better future for their families.”

author
Senior policy adviser with the rights watchdog Norwegian Helsinki Committee
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“It was a dangerous six days because I understood that for Russians my life and the lives of civilians were worth zero. They came to me at night with five or seven soldiers and spoke for about four or five hours, hard dialogue. They wanted to make an example of me about what would happen if we did not agree to what the Russians wanted. Russian soldiers assumed that they would be welcomed but they were not ... and that is why the Russians were very, very angry. There is no food in my city. There is no pharmacy. Half of my city is wrecked. More than 200 people have been kidnapped. It is not safe to walk the streets.”

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Mayor of Melitopol
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“We expect a stronger macro policy response in the second quarter to shore up growth, but the impact will be limited in the context of restricted mobility. The effectiveness of policy stimulus will depend on whether mobility will still be restricted in a broad scale, so risks to the outlook remain skewed to the downside.”

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Lead China economist at Oxford Economics in Hong Kong
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“I think that as more zinc coffins come back from Ukraine, the more people there will be in Russia who have no desire to be next. Such a position will become socially acceptable, understood, and accepted. The mood in society is changing. Earlier, a soldier had to make such a decision alone, at their own risk. But now there are already examples and people can see the consequences. They aren't being shot; they don't face tribunals; they aren't being sent to prison.”

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Lawyer working for legal-aid NGO Agora
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“The phenomenon of refusal is becoming systemic. Such soldiers are found in practically every unit that has returned from Ukraine. According to our estimates, from 20 to 40 percent of the contract servicemen that returned from Ukraine and that are being readied to be sent back are refusing to return to combat. From the cases we have seen, they are being intimidated with threats of prosecution and being worked over by military prosecutors. But so far no one has been prosecuted, according to what we have seen.”

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Founder of the nongovernmental Conflict Intelligence Team (CIT)
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“The Azovstal factory is an enormous space with so many buildings that the Russians ... simply can't find (the Ukrainian forces). That's why they (the Russians) started talking about trying a chemical attack, that's the only way to smoke them out.”

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Military analyst based in Kyiv
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“There is but one China in the world, and Taiwan is an inalienable part of China's territory. The current situation across the Taiwan Strait faces a new round of tension. The root cause is that the Taiwan authorities have repeatedly tried to seek 'Taiwan independence' by soliciting US support, while some in the US intend to contain China with the Taiwan question. The US and Taiwan have colluded with each other, and certain individual deliberately draws parallel between Taiwan and Ukraine despite they are two fundamentally different issues. Their aim is to mislead the public and profit from that. It is such move of playing with fire that would change the status quo across the Taiwan Strait. The Taiwan question is a legacy of the Chinese civil war. China must and will be reunified. We will strive for the prospect of peaceful reunification with utmost sincerity and efforts. That being said, we reserve the option of taking all necessary measures in response to the interference of foreign forces and the secessionist activities of a handful of 'Taiwan independence' separatists. The so-called 'Taiwan Relations Act' unilaterally concocted by the US side runs counter to the principles of the three China-US joint communiqués and basic norms governing international relations. China has been firmly opposed to it since the very beginning. The US has no right to put its domestic law above international law, still less use it as a pretext to meddle in China's internal affairs. On the Taiwan question, the US should abide by the one-China principle and the three China-US joint communiqués, not the so-called 'Taiwan Relations Act'. The US should abide by the one-China principle and stipulations in the three China-US joint communiqués, cut off official interactions and military ties with Taiwan, stop arms sales to Taiwan and take concrete actions to fulfill its commitment of not supporting 'Taiwan independence'.”

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Spokesman for the Chinese foreign ministry
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“There are some suggestions that what [Putin] is trying to do now is take out as much infrastructure and civil society as [possible] and that he has this view that if [he] can't have Ukraine, then Ukrainians can't have it either. That's [the only explanation] that adds up because otherwise the way this war is being conducted is grotesquely at odds with what the [Kremlin] says its objectives are.”

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Emeritus professor of war studies at King's College London and author of The Future Of War
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“Mariupol has been destroyed. There are tens of thousands of dead, but even despite this, the Russians are not stopping their offensive. We need air defence systems, aircraft, tanks and other armoured vehicles, artillery systems and ammunition. And you have something that can be indispensable for us. You have it … It is necessary to help.”

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President of Ukraine
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“No one wants to negotiate with a person or people who tortured this nation. It's all understandable. And as a man, as a father, I understand this very well. We don't want to lose opportunities, if we have them, for a diplomatic solution. We have to fight, but fight for life. You can't fight for dust when there is nothing and no people. That's why it is important to stop this war.”

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President of Ukraine
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“Whether Ukraine can beat back the Russian incursion depends on how fast we will be helped by the United States. To be honest, whether we will be able to survive depends on this. I have 100% confidence in our people and in our armed forces, but unfortunately I don't have the confidence that we will be receiving everything we need.”

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President of Ukraine
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“I was impressed by Khan's anti-corruption platform and was tired of the status quo. But then I saw that while Khan publicly talked about the poor, privately he surrounded himself with wealthy investors.”

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Pakistani politician who served as spokesperson of the Prime Minister of Pakistan, in office from 15 January 2019 to 15 January 2021
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“We feel the same way about the problems everyone has raised and voiced. A lot of our work has not been enough, and there's still a big gap from everyone's expectations. We will do our best to improve. The epidemic prevention and control is now at the most critical moment, and we cannot tolerate the slightest slack.”

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Shanghai's vice mayor
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